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anddiamssemicolon ([personal profile] anddiamssemicolon) wrote in [community profile] ffawiki_backup2016-08-15 12:43 pm
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Sparkindarkness

A gay cis male SJW whose sole issue is whining about how slash writers fetishize gay men. He never seems to realize or mention that many slash writers are lesbians who aren't sexually interested in men, and others are gay men themselves.

 

Sparky is a good buddy of Neo_Prodigy's; the two of them often show up in tandem in wanks about slash, as in this post byEumelia. In July 2011, he was mentioned by one nonny in a thread about this Neo post.

 

"Oh, man, the temptation....... to write satirical, not-at-all-erotic Neo/Sparky slash."

 

Neo has approvingly linked to a Sparky post in which Sparky claimed that M/M writer James Buchanan, who is genderqueer, was "lying and appropriating by using a male name and was going to harm young gay men who read her books and think they're genuine gay male lit." When corrected, he blamed the article he himself linked to in his OP, which makes Buchanan's gender identity quite clear. (Gentlefailer discussion.)

 

Sparky has also railed against author S.J. Pennington for hiding their gender, which he claims is "grossly appropriative" for someone writing M/M. Nonny: "My genderqueer self is side-eyeing sparkindarkness's cis ass for this."

 

Sparky is also buds with Renee. He has blogged for her at Fangs for the Fantasy, and he has participated in wank at Womanist Musings about those horrible (straight white) women who write slash. Note that Renee shouted down, ignored, or deleted comments from queer white women who disagreed with her and Sparky. Because white women are the source of all evil.

 

He has also pissed and moaned about atheists "appropriating" the expression "coming out."

 

Sparky was mentioned in a thread titled "People Who Make You Rage" for asking Gail Carriger if he could interview her, then getting in her face about how her character Lord Akeldama was "a bad gay stereotype" and ignored her attempt to explain Victorian dandyism.